Daily Archives: January 13, 2020

A Glance at Louisville’s Music through LFPL’s catalog

As a budding musician, I’ve been lucky to grow up in Louisville. Being influenced by the movement and history of this scene has created a solid foundation to explore my interests. It serves as a trusty anchor that reminds me to stay engaged with music culture. Thankfully, your local library likes to support this scene in a handful of ways, one of which is by carrying a whole bunch of CD’s produced by local artists!

As always, you can check these things out FOR FREE! I don’t have an exact count, but our local music catalog is around 600 items and is constantly growing. I haven’t heard all of them, but I’ve heard quite a few and I’m always impressed with it. Below are 5 albums from our catalog that I highly recommend – in no particular order.

Hello, Anxious by Mountain Asleep (2008)

This was released right before I noticed our local scene and they were a fan favorite of the community I found for their memorable performances. This chaotic, noodly, and ecstatically positive punk record has left a lasting impression on my musicianship and taste. These members have made music elsewhere in bands like Xerxes, August Moon, Whips/Chains, and Cereal Glyphs to name only a few. Also, listen to a Rhode Island band called Tiny Hawks for a reference on this style of Punk.

Red Glows Brighter by Second Story Man (2006)

This band started in 1998, and though they have a couple of LP’s, this EP stands as my favorite release. The atmosphere they present in this is so pleasant and shimmery that it captures a comforting nostalgic quality. Stylistically, this is an “Indie Rock” band but their identity is unique with complex songwriting and an intriguing sonic palette. I find this somewhere between Sonic Youth’s Experimental or No Wave take on Indie Rock and the poppy dreaminess from someone like The Cocteau Twins.

One Less Heartless To Fear by Shipping News (2010)

This is the last release in a career that started in 1996. It was recorded live at Skull Alley and the energy that comes through is killer. This band helped define the “Louisville Sound” and Post-Rock in the 90’s with its dark aesthetic, mathy time signatures, avant-garde construction, and spoken word vocal performances. If you like Noise Rock and Post-Hardcore in bands like Shellac or SWANS, this refined and uniquely Louisville approach will come off as tasteful, elegant, and sublime.

Spiderland by Slint (1991)

If Shipping News helped define Louisville and Post-Rock, this album is the progenitor. This blurb won’t do justice like the books or documentaries about it, but this broke the rules of Rock music and its influence is seen around the world. If The Beatles wrote the blueprint for the “Rock Band”, Slint deconstructed that and put an existential memoir next to it. I can’t point to similar music other than Post-Rock bands to come after it, but if you are moved by something like Martin Luther’s 95 Theses, you’ll admire this reformation.

Self Help by Straight A’s (2010)

Though I might call this a “Punk” record for its explosive attitude, it bears little resemblance to many Emo/Hardcore conventions from someone like Mountain Asleep. This album is weird, angular, and discordant, all while being very catchy and dancey. I love the short songs, most being under 2 minutes and none reaching the 3-minute mark. Imagine the oddly sexy, dancey vibes of The Blood Brothers, the abrasion from Mindless Self Indulgence, and the stripped-down instrumentation from Pre.

— Reviewed by Noah, Bon Air