Author Archives: carissamiller

Girl in Disguise

Girl in Disguise by Greer MacAllister is a novel about the first female Pinkerton agent, Kate Warne, whose real life is almost stranger than fiction. I first discovered Kate in a Netflix show called the Pinkerton’s. I did the proper library assistant thing and researched her. Not only was she  the first female Pinkerton detective she also lead the women’s detective bureau part of the agency. Not much is known about her before she become a Pinkerton agent, leaving both historians and novelist alike to wonder who Kate Warne was.

Greer MacAllister breathes life into her own version of Kate’s history before she becomes a Pinkerton agent. The novel sucked me into the story and Kate’s world from the first chapter. It  begins in 1856 and continues through the Civil War but ends soon after the Civil War. Greer gives her own spin to a few of Kate’s actual cases as a Pinkerton, including cases that may or may not have been real. One of the most nerve racking and nail biting parts of the book  is her working to get Lincoln to Washington without him being killed before being sworn in as President. This is based on Kate’s most famous case as a Pinkerton.

It’s hard to put Girl in Disguise into a genre category even though the library had it classified as general fiction. To me it is a bit of biographical fiction and historical fiction with a bit of mystery thrown in. Fans of historical fiction, mystery, biographical fiction, detective fiction will enjoy this book. Kate Warne proves that sometimes life can be more mysterious than fiction.

Formats Available: Book, eBook

Reviewed by CarissaMain Library

The Book Jumper

The Book Jumper by Mechthild Glaser is a novel translated from the author’s native German, and while it is a teen novel most book lovers would love it. Amy Lennox grew up not knowing anything about her mother’s family or anything about their unique ability. Amy has always been a bookworm so to her reading is an escape, a way to visit new worlds without leaving home. But when she and her mother return to Scotland for the summer Amy discovers that her family reads books differently from other people; they are book jumpers.

As a book jumper Amy discovers that books can indeed take you to new worlds, in the sense that you can end up in the middle of the story. The books come alive around you. But you don’t become part of the story, you can’t, because the first rule that Amy learns is that a book jumper must protect the stories. Don’t do anything to change the story. It cannot change its path.

But Amy discovers that someone or something is trying to change the stories. At first everyone wants to blame her because she’s new to the island. The only one who believes her is fellow book jumper Will. Will agrees to help her get to the bottom of the mystery. But in the process the two end up on an adventure neither saw coming.

The book starts out slow but once Amy and her mom go to Scotland the story picks up and becomes a page turner from then on.

   Formats Available: Book

Reviewed by CarissaMain Library

Mystery Book Discussion

The newest book discussion group in the library system is the Mystery Book Discussion at the Main Library.

The very first book read by the group for the first meeting was a classic, Agatha Christie’s Murder on the Orient Express. For November and December the group read In the Woods by Tana French and The Snowman by Jo Nesbo. While it has started off as a small group it is slowly growing.

The first three months of 2017 are already planned out:

  • With the reading of Rebecca by Daphne Du Maurier, the meeting for that discussion is January 17, 2017.

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  • In February the group will be reading A Judgement in Stone by Ruth Rendell and that discussion will be on February 21, 2017.

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  • The book for March will be another Agatha Christie classic, The Murder at the Vicarage, and that discussion will be on March 21, 2016.

If you enjoy reading mysteries, or you enjoy talking about books feel free to stop by the Main Library to pick up a copy of any of the reads. And if you’ve thought about reading mysteries and didn’t have a book in mind or didn’t know where to start, hopefully one of the Mystery Book Discussions will help.

The Mystery Book Discussion is held every third Tuesday of the month at 2:00 PM at the Main library.

Fox and O’Hare Series by Janet Evanovich

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Fox and O’Hare is one of the newest series by Janet Evanovich and Lee Goldberg. This is series is a cross between White Collar and Leverage. Nick is the Fox of the team as well as the con artist that’s been caught by the FBI. Kate is the O’Hare of the team and the agent that catches Nick, hence the similarities to White Collar. The Leverage part deals with the rag tag team of “specialists” that Kate and Nick hire to help them carry out the cons, conning other con artists. It’s a deal that Nick made to stay out of jail.

Each member of the team added gets weirder than the last. There’s a crazy former waitress who was apparently was a NASCAR driver in another life. There’s also an architect, an engineer, and a computer guy, as well as an out of work actor. The group rounds itself out with Kate’s retired military father who likes to pretend he’s not really retired. Instead he spends his free time helping Kate out and bringing his military buddies along on some of the cons, most of which are as crazy as he is.

The premise of the Fox and O’Hare series is that it takes a con artist to catch a con artist. But it also takes an FBI agent to keep said con artist in line. So Kate’s got to work with Nick and she just doesn’t want to. As an FBI agent she’s used to putting guys like Nick in jail, not being partnered with them. However, it’s a secret partnership and if they are caught during one of their cons they are on their own, they get no help from the FBI what so ever. Nick will be in prison and Kate – if she’s lucky – will only lose her job.  If she’s not she will also be in a federal prison.

The Fox and O’Hare series is different from Evanovich’s previous series but it still has her trademark humor, wit, and writing style.  The Heist is the first book, check it out to see if you like it.

The library has all five books that have been published so far.

Formats Available: Book (Regular Print), Large Type, and Audiobook

Reviewed by CarissaMain Library

A Study in Charlotte

studyncharlotteA Study in Charlotte is a retelling of Sherlock Holmes but with a twist. The two main characters who are teenagers are descendants (great-great- great children to be exact) of Sherlock Holmes and John Watson. Both Charlotte Holmes and Jamie Watson find themselves at the same Connecticut boarding school. The novel’s storyline has the premise that John Watson not Sir Arthur Conan Doyle that wrote the Sherlock novels. Charlotte’s family is pretty much still famous as well as rich, while Jamie’s family has pretty much drifted into obscurity.

When a murder happens at their school that leaves both Jamie and Charlotte as prime suspects it’s up to Charlotte to clear their names and fast. The female Sherlock Holmes was surprisingly enjoyable twist. As a Sherlock Holmes purist I didn’t think that I would enjoy it. Charlotte Holmes still has the same quirks that Sherlock has that we know and love.

A Study in Charlotte by Brittany Cavallaro brings Sherlock to a new generation of readers, as well as quite possibly introducing teenage girls to the detective genre. A Study in Charlotte shows teenage girls that they can be detectives as well as be interested in science. That they can be anything they put their minds to. Charlotte isn’t always the most likeable character but she does have her moments. The book ends with the loose ends tied up, but does leave the ending opened for a squeal.

Formats Available: Book

Reviewed by CarissaMain Library

Cozy Mysteries: What’s the Deal?

Many readers more than likely assume that all mysteries are the same.  That’s not true mysteries are as unique as their fiction counterparts.  There’s the classic detective story, the traditional suspense, as well as the murder mystery, the police drama just to name a few.

Then there’s the cozy mystery subgenre, which is a whole different type of mystery.  Think Jessica Fletcher in Murder She Wrote.  Don’t let that fool you – these aren’t your grandmother’s mysteries.

Jessica-Fletcher

Another way to look at cozy mysteries is basically that they are Nancy Drew and The Hardy Boys for grownups.  So if you loved those series as a kid and want to continue reading similar books but know that you don’t want to read kids’ books as an adult then cozy mysteries are the perfect alternative to getting caught reading adult books.

The main character in a cozy mystery – the mystery solver – just happens to be an average citizen with no police, or detective experience.  Many times they work to so solve the mystery because the local law enforcement is incompetent or they are a family member or friend have been accused of the crime, and they want to clear themselves or some else as quickly as possible.

There is a cozy mystery out there for just about any reading taste. Cozy mysteries have a cast of characters though on average it tends to be heroines.  They can have any type of career, the following of which are but to name a few:

There are quite a few cozies that feature librarians as the hero or heroine, such as the Library Lover’s Mystery series by Jenn McKinlay.  There’s even a series or two that have a cat helping to solve a mystery, the Cat in the Stacks series by Miranda James and the Lighthouse Library Mystery series by Eva Gates.

There’s a cozy mysteries for every reading type, and there’s one for you.  If you’re not sure where to start just stop in at any library and the reference staff will help find the right cozy for you.

Article by Carissa, Main Library

The Cuckoo’s Calling by Robert Galbraith

cuckooscallingThe Cuckoo’s Calling was written by Robert Galbraith, the pseudonym for J.K. Rowling of Harry Potter fame. When I picked this mystery up I didn’t know what to expect. As a teen I loved the Harry Potter series. I attempted to read The Casual Vacancy, the adult fiction novel that she wrote under her own name, and didn’t really care for it. So I went into The Cuckoo’s Calling, the first book in the Cormoran Strike series, with caution even though I do love a good mystery. I was presently surprised with this book in a good way.

The Cuckoo’s Calling is a mystery set in contemporary London. Cormoran Strike is a wounded former SIB with the Royal Army, what would be the military police in the United States. The novel opens with his detective agency in trouble. Strike is in debt to people he really shouldn’t have borrowed money from in the first place; the same people are demanding that he repay the loan immediately or else. To top it off he’s living in his office and he cannot keep a secretary.

A case that could either make Strike’s career or finish it lands in his lap. The brother of one of his former school friends wants him to find out what really happened to the victim of an apparent suicide. The police have written the case off as a suicide but Strike’s client is convinced that the victim was murdered. He soon discovers there’s more to his new secretary than meets the eye. She’s actually quite capable of helping with his cases.

The Cuckoo’s Calling starts out a little slow but that’s to be expected with a first book in a series. It has to set up the storyline and character development. It starts to pick up from the middle of the book onward. The mystery ends with a twist that the reader might not see coming. The Cuckoo’s Calling puts a modern twist on the classic detective novel. Cormoran Strike is the new broody detective quite possibly Sherlock Holmes for a new generation.

The library also carries the next two books in the series, The Silkworm and Career of Evil.

Formats Available: Regular Type, Large Type, Audiobook, eBook

Reviewed by CarissaMain Library