Category Archives: Library Programs

Indie Author Day 2016

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Saturday, October 8, 2–4 p.m. at the Main Library

The Indie Author Day initiative is working with libraries across North America to bring together all of our local writing communities for the biggest celebration and collaboration of indie authors in the world!

Join us at the Main Library for a digital gathering of writers, agents, and industry leaders at this first annual event, and spend some time meeting and networking with members of the local writing community.

Please call (502) 574-1611 to register.

Following the seminar, learn to create and format professional quality versions of your book in a free workshop using a new online library resource called Pressbooks.

Whether you are a writing pro or a beginner, you can write, edit, and design digital and print copies of your book with ease using FREE resources and services offered by the Library. When you’re finished, share your book digitally with libraries across Kentucky.

September is Roald Dahl Month

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The United States held special meaning in Roald Dahl‘s life.  He lived in Washington, D.C., as a spy in the 1940s, where met his first wife, Patricia Neal.  He also wrote two of his most popular children’s books, James and the Giant Peach and Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, while living in the U.S.

This year, for the first time ever, Roald Dahl Month will take place all across the U.S.  Restaurants, zoos, gardens, bookstores, and libraries are inventing Dahlicious Delights, holding Buckswashling Nature programs, hosting parties during Wondercrump Weekend, among other celebrations.

You can celebrate Roald Dahl Month with these titles available though LFPL.

How-To Festival is One Month Away!

5th annual How-To Festival returns to LFPL’s Main Library

Saturday, May 14, 10 a.m. – 3 p.m.

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Want to learn how to milk a cow? Make a robot? Stop a leaky faucet? Act out Shakespeare?

Those are just a sample of more than 100 things people can learn in five hours at the Louisville Free Public Library’s fifth annual How-To Festival.

This year, local presenters will offer a variety of free interactive learning experiences – from dancing to crafts to gardening – that offer entertainment and practical skills for adults, children and teens. “How-to” sessions last anywhere from 15 to 45 minutes and cover a range of activities, from brewing your own beer to Zumba.

This year’s Festival is a mix of past favorites – how to age gracefully, train your dog, and BBQ – along with new lessons, including how to create a banana piano, how to read Tarot cards, and how to make chainmail jewelry. Kid-friendly activities include how to walk, talk and dance like a pirate and how to hula hoop. Plus, Mayor Greg Fischer will be a special guest presenter this year, teaching “how-to start a business.”

The How-To Festival takes place on Saturday, May 14, from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at the Main Library, 301 York Street. Sessions will be located in more than 20 areas throughout the building and surrounding grounds, transforming the entire library into a giant classroom. Food trucks will be available.

The How-To Festival is free and open to the public. For more information, including a schedule of sessions, visit LFPL.org/how-to.

Already know you’re coming? RSVP on our Facebook event page. And don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and Instagram using #HowToFestival.

Resources for Local Writers and Authors at LFPL

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Local authors — independent, self-published, aspiring, and mainstream — now have access to a valuable suite of services thanks to the Louisville Free Public Library’s IndieLou Author Series. IndieLou features programs for aspiring authors on how to write and publish, opportunities for indie authors to schedule appearances at the Library, and a way for self-published authors to upload and share their work in the Library’s eBook collection.

The Main and Southwest Regional libraries will be hosting IndieLou author visits twice per month – giving authors the opportunity to reserve a meeting space and promote their book at the Library. Information on scheduling an IndieLou Author Talk, including available dates and times, can be found at LFPL.org/IndieLou.

Scheduling is made possible through ePublishorBust.com.

Self-published and independent authors can also share their eBooks with local libraries through LFPL’s new SELF-e service (hosted by Biblioboard). eBooks uploaded to SELF-e will be added to the Louisville Free Public Library collection and made available to other Kentucky public libraries via the Indie Kentucky feature on Biblioboard.

Participation is free.

Finally, the Library is offering an array of resources to help local writers.  Whether through programs like the Women Writers series at the Iroquois Library in March, the Writers Conference at Southwest Regional Library, and the How to Write a Book in Six Weeks short course at Main (both in May); through self-guided learning using LFPL’s Lynda.com service; or at special library classes on how to use Biblioboard and SELF-e; LFPL is working hard to support writers in our community.

For more information on IndieLou’s suite of services, including upcoming author events, visit LFPL.org/IndieLou.

 

So You Want to Be a Writer?

Saturday, January 23, 2016 – 10:00 AM12:00 PM

KellyCreagh

Join author Kelly Creagh for a crash course on writing and publishing.

Space is limited.  Please call 574-1611 and press “0” to register.

The idea of writing a book can be overwhelming.  Where do you start?  What do you need to know about the craft?  What are your options for publication, and how do you find an agent or editor?

Join author Kelly Creagh for a crash course on writing and publishing, and learn tips and strategies to help you start, finish, and publish your work.

BIO: Kelly Creagh is the author of the Nevermore trilogy, a modern day, supernatural romance for young adult readers that is inspired by the life, works and mysterious death of Edgar Allan Poe. Kelly is a 2008 graduate of Spalding University’s MFA in Writing for Children and Young Adults. In addition to writing, Kelly enjoys teaching and performing the ancient art of belly dance. Visit her at www.KellyCreagh.com.

301 York Street

Louisville, KY USA 40203

What is Digital Storytelling?

“Digital storytelling is the modern expression of the ancient art of storytelling. Throughout history, storytelling has been used to share knowledge, wisdom, and values. Stories have taken many different forms. Stories have been adapted to each successive medium that has emerged, from the circle of the campfire to the silver screen, and now the computer screen.” Digital Storytelling Association

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Join renowned cellist, composer, and storyteller Ben Sollee as he discusses Digital Storytelling: Trends and Opportunities for the Independent Musician.

This is a ticketless event but registration is required.

To reserve your spot, click here or call our ticket line at (502) 574-1644.

Upcoming Author Talks at LFPL

Bestselling author and historian

H.W. Brands

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Main Library, Monday, June 15, 7 p.m.

Join bestselling author and historian H.W. Brands for a discussion of his latest book Reagan: The Life. Brands teaches history and writing at the University of Texas at Austin. #LFPLAuthors

This is a free event, but tickets are required – click here.


Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist

David Hoffman

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Main Library, Thursday, July 21, 7 p.m.

Join Pulitzer-Prize winning journalist David Hoffman for a discussion of his latest book The Billion Dollar Spy. Hoffman is a contributing editor at The Washington Post. #LFPLAuthors

Tickets available starting June 1, 2015.


Miss an author event, or just want to enjoy a presentation again?

Listen to the podcast or Watch it online

Authors at the Library
Welcome to LFPL’s “At the Library” series, an ongoing podcast featuring author talks, programs and events at the Louisville Free Public Library.

Subscribe to this podcast Subscribe with iTunes

In Defense of Comics, pt. 3

I had originally intended this segment to be a discussion of how comics can be differentiated from other visual arts but points in my original post have generated some very good questions from readers that should be addressed first.

The questions all refer back to the following statement:

“Comics are not just for kids and never really were except for those with some deep investment in an arbitrary highbrow/lowbrow distinction. This distinction is one based on historically constructed relations that give privilege to very debatable aesthetic principles.” (Buchanan, 2014)

You’ll notice that this paragraph is – primarily – composed of two assertions, one about the appropriateness of comics to any particular age group and another about the standards for judging a form of art.  The latter point also expressly questions such standards based on an – ancillary – investigation into how such standards are derived (or rather, constructed).  Implied in the standards are further questions regarding the nature of this “authority” (i.e., what fits a certain category of art, who can or should enforce standards for the categories, etc.).

Let’s look at the first assumption, often expressed by critics of comics as some variation of “comics are just for children,” and how it fails to hold up as something other there than a pat dismissal of the art form.

For the sake of discussion, let’s define comics quickly as publications that tell stories with pictures on paper using pencil and/or ink that may or may not incorporate words.  It’s not the only – or even best – definition but it conforms well to the general understanding of what makes a comic.  In the West, broadsides and their descendants, mass publication newspapers, have included such stories – either editorial or entertaining – in some form since the 18th Century.

These information outlets have hardly been within the purview of children in that time.  Other than following the comics page, children have used newspapers mostly for mandatory research into a current or historical event for class.  With the rise of the Internet, even the modern media-savvy child is less likely to read the printed newspaper than ever before.  Further, children’s input into mass publication newspapers has rarely extended beyond the comics page.  Only a few features such as comics page war-horse Slylock Fox have solicited input from and encouraged participation by kids.

Mass publication newspapers are owned by, created by, and published for adults.  As cartoons (and comic strips) have been a staple of newspapers for over 200 years, it would indicate that they are deemed appropriate for adults.  The function of the comic strip was to leaven serious publications with some light-hearted fun, helping to increase circulation.  It is this aspect of joviality that gave the comic its name, separating it from the more serious (in intent) “cartoon.”

The evolution of the comic strip to the comic book was tied to the fortunes of the newspaper in the era between the First and Second World Wars.  The earliest comic books were simply republications of strips in a different format.  The first monthly comic book, Comics Monthly, was published in 1922. It lasted for 12 issues and reprinted various comic strips from 1921. During the Great Depression, publishers even created comic books for give-away just to keep their very expensive printing presses running.

Traditional comic books have been consumed by adults continuously since 1920’s.  During World War II, about 44% of servicemen read comics regularly and another 13% read them occasionally. (Gordon, 1998, p. 139)  According to the U.S. War Department, comics accounted for approximately 25% of all printed materials sent overseas to soldiers in 1944. (Gordon, 1998, p. 140)  Figures for comic book readers over the years are notoriously hard to pin down but adults have become the dominant demographic as generations of comic fans have grown older and continue to read them.

So why were comics supposedly just for children?

Looking back to the period before World War II when this cultural attitude took root, the newspaper was often considered a lower form of information than literature or scholarly studies.  It was literally disposable.  Comic strips – one of the least important features – were especially ephemeral, viewed by many as nothing that an adult would think twice about.

Even the stand alone comic book was thought to be a cheap publication akin to pulp magazines rather than a proper book.  The lurid or gaudy figures that dominated comics in those days – private detectives, action adventurers, funny animals, and superheroes – were deemed inappropriate for “literature.”  The stories were seen as less coherent and less meaningful, as something that appealed to the under-developed tastes of children.

Further comics were under attack during the late 1940’s to early 1950’s.  The attacks were part of a general paranoia about the rising demographic of the “teen” and its potential delinquency.  It culminated in the Comics Code Authority, a self-regulating board for the comics industry, which enforced a series of rules which guaranteed that comics in the U.S. would be suitable for children.  Unfortunately, the industry was also stifled from developing for many years, so much so that mainstream comics ended up reinforcing the idea of the art form being “just for children.”

How this all changed is something for another article, though.

If you would like to talk about comics further, please join us for the Graphic Novel Discussion Group at the Main Library. The next meeting will take place tomorrow, May 11th, at 6:00 PM.

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Works Cited:

Buchanan, A. (2014, September 25). In Defense of Comics. Retrieved May 10, 2015, from http://blogs.lfpl.org/readers/734/

Gordon, I. (1998). Comic Strips and Consumer Culture, 1890-1945. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press.

 Article by Tony, Main Library

Alexander McCall Smith is coming to LFPL

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New York Times bestselling author of The No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency series

Alexander McCall Smith

Main Library, Thursday, April 9, 7 p.m.

Join author Alexander McCall Smith for a discussion of his latest book Emma—a retelling of Jane Austen’s classic story, with a modern-day twist. #LFPLAuthors

This is a free event, but tickets are required – click here.


Authors at the Library podcast

Miss an author event, or just want to enjoy a presentation again?

In Defense of Comics

Some – as I will call him – Random Dude recently told me, “Why don’t you read a real book?  You’re an adult, aren’t you?”  This person overheard me discussing a graphic novel with a friend and felt compelled to be a jerk, it would seem.  Jerk?  Yes, I wrote that (and wished I had said it to him rather than pointedly staring until he walked away).

The guy is a jerk for two reasons:

  1. Comics are real books. They’re not “texts” in the manner understood by structuralism where narrative can exist outside of a formal literary manifestation (common examples in structuralist writings are cinema, music, or art).  Comics have clear “beginning, middle, and end” structure and are created with an eye for some form of codex.  Even web-comics typically mimic either the comic strip or the comic book or are repackaged as such for general consumption once obtaining enough popularity to be commercially viable.
  1. Comics are not just for kids and never really were except for those with some deep investment in an arbitrary highbrow/lowbrow distinction. This distinction is one based on historically constructed relations that give privilege to very debatable aesthetic principles.

Long gone are the days when it could reasonably be said that a culture is only developed and leaves its legacy in the rarefied fields of arts and literature.  Comics, film, video games, and other pop culture artifacts are not just effluvia that can be ignored.  They shape and reflect the contours of modern society, like it or not.

The French have considered comics to be a “ninth art” (following architecture, sculpture, painting, dance, music, poetry, cinema, and television) for the past fifty years.  The term arises from a series of articles starting in 1964 by Maurice De Bevere (known by his pseudonym Morris) in the French weekly Spirou.  While Morris questioned whether comics should be considered the ninth or the seventh art (as cinema and television developed after comics), the term became accepted widely in France.

One of the largest comic conventions in the world, the Angoulême International Comics Festival, has been held every year in Angouleme, France since 1974.  The prestigious Grand Prix de la ville d’Angoulême prize is awarded at the Festival to creators for their body of work and/or contribution to the development of comics. This year’s recipient is Bill Watterson.  He is, of course, the reclusive creator of the beloved Calvin and Hobbes comic strip.

Another example closer to home is actually a very old one at this point.  In 2001, Michael Chabon won the Pulitzer Prize “for distinguished fiction by an American author, preferably dealing with American life” for his work, The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & ClayThe story is completely the product of comics, particularly the unique social circumstances of the late 1930’s that helped to produce the superhero genre and the American comic book industry that we know today.

Historically, the comics industry is a subset of the larger publishing world.  Like publishing in general, comics vary greatly in the type and quality of individual works but taken as a whole respond to the real and/or perceived demand of consumers. In the era of Chabon’s story, the demand for a superhero character had been building for some time due to the cultural stew of adventure tales, science fiction, and crime stories that were popular at the time.  A superhero combines all these genre elements in one brightly-colored package.

But comics and cartooning are so much more than superheroes.  So in the spirit of honest dialogue – the kind of dialogue that Random Dude was not interested in having – I will be posting a series of articles about comics in order to explain them to those who are unfamiliar.  I don’t know how often an article will appear or how long this series will run but I do hope that you’ll follow me on an exploration of this vibrant art form.

Before I go, I want to let you know that this week happens to be the annually sponsored American Library Association (ALA) event known as Banned Books Week (September 21st – September 27th).  This year, in partnership with the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund (CBLDF), Banned Books Week will be spotlighting graphic novels and the history of comic book censorship.  As the CBLDF web site states:

Comics are one of the most commonly attacked types of books, with challenges and bans happening every year. In the last few years, attempts to ban critically acclaimed graphic novels Persepolis and Barefoot Gen made international headlines. Other comics attacked in recent years include all-ages classics like Bone by Jeff Smith, which made ALA’s list of the ten most challenged books in 2013, as well as acclaimed books for adult readers like Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home

If you haven’t ever read a graphic novel or a comic book, I challenge you to try one out.  Come on in to your local library branch and we’ll help you find something that suits your tastes.  And if you do read graphic novels and wish to talk about them, I encourage you to come to LFPL’s Graphic Novel Discussion Group, which meets at 7:00 PM on the second Monday of every month at the Main Library.

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 Article by Tony, Main Library