Mystery Book Discussion Group

Do you like reading Mysteries? Do enjoy discussing what you’ve read but can’t find anyone to discuss them with? Then come to the Mystery Book Discussion Group at the Main Library where we discuss a different mystery every month.

We meet on the third Tuesday of the month from 2:00 pm  to 3:00 pm in the Boardroom on the second floor of the North Building.

Dates and selections for the first six months of 2019 are:

Revisiting a Childhood Disappointment – The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupery

          When I was a child, I recall stories and anecdotes, related to me by adults, of the power and wonder of the children’s book The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupery.  Subsequently, the book assumed a somewhat mythic aura that intimidated me to a sufficient degree that I delayed its reading.  Then one day, I came across a copy and made the decision to open myself to its power and, thus, move to a higher plane of understanding and awareness.  However, I was sorely disappointed and found the story ridiculous and pointless.

          Move forward in time by many years to the present, and I, now an adult, found myself once again gazing at the cover of The Little Prince with its seemingly prosaic sketch, this copy having been returned to the library in which I work.  It is then that I decided to reread this book from my past and gauge the tale from the viewpoint of an older person with far more life experience, and my reaction could not have been more different.  I no longer viewed the simplicity of the story as ridiculous; rather, this only added to the clarity of its messages.  And the plot that I previously saw devoid of any real action and, therefore, pointless, now conveyed to me a story of sublime profundity.

          When I think of how other authors investigate the same themes of this book – the journey from childhood to adulthood, love and friendship, avarice and pride – my awe of what Mr. Saint-Exupery accomplishes in less than one hundred pages only grows. It is no wonder that The Little Prince has sold more than four million copies and been translated in to over two hundred fifty languages and dialects since its publication in 1943.

          This past Saturday, my book discussion group met and discussed The Little Prince, based on my recommendation, and in my fourteen years with this group, this was one of the best discussions, in my mind at least, we have ever had.  And I found it interesting that several who remember reading it when younger were also unimpressed at their first readings (one even threw the book in the trash after its finish), and upon this second attempt, everyone seemed quite moved.  For this reason, I encourage a revisit or even a first reading of what is now a favorite book.

Reviewed by Rob, Crescent Hill

Reading, Writing, and Reviewing, pt. 1

Really, how hard is it to knock out a book? It’s just a few hundred pages sitting there on your desk. But, hey, you’re a busy cat and you’ve got things to do!

Words on a page ought not to be daunting but sometimes it’s impossible to escape the guilt.  That story keeps haunting you, a ghost lingering in the back of your mind. If it’s good, it’s a welcome tug that will finally pull you back into graceful orbit over a magical world. And if the tale is terrible, well, then it’s like being back in high school with that burnt out teacher. You know the one, he or she took joy in watching you squirm when they asked a master’s thesis level question you had no chance of answering.

You know what sometimes can be worse? Having to write a review about a book, particularly one that may be underwhelming. This is especially true if you have settled into reading a particular sub-genre that you are a little bored with from jump. I mean, urban fantasy is a good ten years past it’s heyday in my mind. So it’s really on me because I wanted comfort. I selected the book using a loose familiarity with the author and a summary on the back of the paperback which teased a slightly new twist to well-worn genre tropes.

What work is this? Discount Armageddon by Seanan McGuire. I’m not even really going to describe it beyond the following:

“Verity Price is a tough young woman with a secret life protecting ‘cryptids’ (magical) beings from harm who has to take on the hot young zealot out to get them, only to end up teaming up with him to rescue a dragon from an evil cult. Sexy times and ballroom dancing ensue.”

Barring snappy banter here and there, that’s really it. Plus sequels.

Don’t get me wrong, McGuire is normally a great read (I like her other series, featuring the character October Daye) and moments really do shine in the book. There surely are people who must love the series because she keeps writing sequels.  So far, seven novels have been published and another one is scheduled for release in early 2019.

I don’t want to discourage anyone from reading it because, hey, maybe it’s just not for me. But what I’d like to focus on for the rest of this article (and other upcoming ones) is what to do when you find yourself in a corner such as I ended up. Where does that next book come from?

Usually you ask someone, right? If it’s someone who knows you and they have the right frame of mind, they can match something to you in no time. At the very least you will find out what they are reading. That gives you something to talk about the next time you see them if nothing else.

Maybe you are reading a magazine that gives reviews. Maybe you are watching TV and they interview an author about their latest work. Or maybe you go into store with books and just browse until something strikes your fancy.

These are the things that most people do but — commonly — there is one thing they do not do or do very rarely. What is that one thing? Ask your local librarian for a suggestion.

If you are unable to make it to a library branch, you can always use our online Ask a Librarian form. Short answers will be sent within 24 hours. Longer answers will be returned as soon as possible.

Or during the months of December 2018, January 2019, and February 2019, you can sign up for suggestions from a librarian as part of our Books & Brews 502. All you need to do is attend one of the scheduled events.

For more info on LFPL’s Adult Winter Reading Program, click here.

Article by Tony,Main Library

Top Ten Graphics of 2018

Here are some of my favorite comics read in 2018. They may or may not have been published this year. Also, a few have more than one volume and I have not designated a particular volume if I would recommend the whole series.

My picks are listed in alphabetical (rather than rank) order.

4 Kids Walk Into A Bank by Matthew Rosenberg and Tyler Boss

Dig it, Stranger Things meets The Usual Supects! Four misfit kids try to help out one of their number’s father. He is being forced into pulling a bank heist with his recently released former partners in crime. The four plan to pull the heist off first so that he won’t have to do it…and then all hell breaks loose.

 

Anarchy Comics: The Complete Collection, edited by Jay Kinney

Exactly what it says, man…comics about Anarchy! Or rather Anarchism, both historical and speculative. This classic Underground Comix has finally been given the omnibus treatment it deserves.

 

Bat-manga!: The Secret History of Batman in Japan by Juro Kiwata

Best thing ever! The entire run of the 1960’s manga version of Batman, organized by graphic designer extraordinare Chip Kidd. Thrill to these far-out tales, especially as the Caped Crusader faces down the infamous Lord Death Man!

 

Bookhunter by Jason Shiga

Don’t try to steal that book or stiff the library on money you owe or else the intrepid Bookhunters squad will hunt you down! Set in Oakland, CA, in 1973, Shiga’s Library Police take us on a thrill a minute adventure.

 

The Don Rosa Archives, vol. 2: Captain Kentucky by Don Rosa

Meet Lance Pertwillaby as he he gains super-powers and embarks on crazy adventures, such as battling a Godzilla-sized J. Fred Frog threatening to destroy downtown Louisville. This volume collects local cartooning legend Don Rosa’s comic strips which ran in the Louisville Times back in the day.

 

Exit Stage Left: The Snagglepuss Chronicles by Mark Russell and Mike Feehan

It’s 1953 and Snagglepuss is a renowned playwright who gets called before the House Un-American Activities Committee (H.U.A.C.). At the same time, long-term friend Huckleberry Hound has been found in a compromising situation that has ruined the fellow playwright’s career. Snagglepuss’ testimony will help make Huckleberry Hound’s problems go away but will he sacrifice his artistic integrity?

 

Kill or Be Killed by Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips

Loser tries to kill himself but manages to survive…thanks to a DEMON! All he has to do in exchange is kill one bad person a month.  Or could it be his mental illness manifesting now that he stopped taking his meds? Author Ed Brubaker and artist Sean Phillips once again collaborate, this time on a psychological crime comic. You won’t be able to stop turning pages till the end!

 

Maximum Minimum Wage by Bob Fingerman

Classic Gen-X comic about the struggles of a cartoonist and his hothead girlfriend as they try to get by in New York. Will they find the job of their dreams? Will they even be able to pay rent? 

 

Shaolin Cowboy: Who’ll Stop the Reign? by Geof Darrow and Dave Stewart

One man’s fight to survive the revenge attempts of his undead and supernatural foes. Crazy awesome detailed art from Geof Darrow is worth the price of admission alone!

 

William B. DuBay’s The Rook by William B. Dubay, Budd Lewis, and Luis Bermejo

Restin Dane is the Master of Time. Follow him, his faithful android man-servant Manners, and his cranky outlaw grand-pappy Bishop Dane, as they travel through time battling the forces of evil.

 


 

All of these works can be checked out from LFPL. Each title has a “Check Our Catalog” link that will take you to where you can view the location and status of the specific item in our system.

After taking a look, if your selection is not available at the branch you wish to go to, you may have the item shipped there by placing a hold request (using the “Place Request” button on the right hand side of the item’s catalog entry).

 


 

If you are interested in discussing these titles or other works of sequential art, please join LFPL’s Graphic Novel Discussion Group. Meetings are held at the Main Library on the second Monday of every month, starting at 6:00 PM.

Our next meeting is this upcoming Monday, December 10, 2018. We will be discussing DC’s Aquaman.

 

 

 

 

Local Author Fair at the Main Library

This Saturday, December 1st, 2018, from 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM

Join Louisville’s writing community at the Main Library to share knowledge and resources with established and aspiring writers.

Spend your day at the Author’s Market to meet and network with 20+ independent and self-published authors, and hear presentations from authors and the experts at Insider Louisville, Savvy Communication, Louisville Literary Arts, and LFPL.

Whether you are a writing pro or a beginner, you can write, edit, and design digital and print copies of your book with ease using FREE resources and services offered by the Library, services you will learn all about at this Local Author’s Fair.


Presenters 

  • Amy Miller – The Literary Culture in Louisville
  • Susan Lindsay – How to Hire and Work with an Editor
  • Patricia Smith – Researching and Integrating Historical Material with a Fictional Story
  • Kevin Gibson – Choosing a Forum for Publication

Author’s Market Participants

  • Nancy Beranek
  • Dan Bowlds
  • Tiara Church
  • Courtney Diles
  • Carolyn Furdek
  • Cathy Fyock
  • Lindsay Gargotto
  • Kevin Gibson
  • Kenn Grimes
  • Cynthia Hoosier
  • Keith Huff
  • Shaneeka Jones
  • Susan Lindsey
  • Veda McClain
  • Amy Miller
  • Amy Metz
  • Rose Pressey
  • Patricia Smith
  • Carson Torpey
  • Tytianna N.M. Wells
  • Ron Whitehead

Main Library
301 York Street

LouisvilleKY 40203
502-574-1611

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Bearskin by James A McLaughlin

Wherever I go, so goes a book I am currently reading. For this reason, booklists have become part of my search of good reads. Many lists marketed by publishers focus on popular fiction and well-known authors; it was a bit of a surprise when I came across James A. McLaughlin’s debut; the gritty novel, Bearskin.

Rice Moore is on the run. After barely escaping with his life from an Arizona prison, he took a job as a Wildlife Protection officer. Tucked away on a forest preserve in Virginia’s Appalachian Plateau, it seemed like a good place to lay low while he hid from men in a Mexican cartel, until the day a mushroom forager led him to a mutilated bear carcass. Poachers. Now the hunt was on, and Rice would have to leave his mountain sanctuary to go in search of the killers. And this is just the beginning.

Rice gets help in his pursuit of the poachers from his predecessor, Sara Birkeland. In his pursuit of the poachers, he draws too much attention to himself. There are clashes with the locals, the police are looking at him and now he finds himself fighting with drug runners instead of running with them.

This action-packed, gritty tale starts out as a man trying to put his life back together after prison but finds you can’t always run from your past and doing the right thing may be harder than just looking the other way. Told in third person, there are flashbacks that help the reader get a better understanding of this man who refuses to back down. McLaughlin’s words and story draw the reader in, with life in Appalachia in all its tough, beautiful, rugged, dangerous glory. Readers looking for a rocky adventure, tough terrain, and heroes with flaws will be drawn in and will stay to find out who will prevail.

Format Available: Book & Downloadable Ebook

Review by Micah, St Matthews

Into the Water by Paula Hawkins

The pool has been a place where many women have spent the last minutes of their life, whether by suicide or by force; maybe even murder. Nel Abbott tries in vain to reach out to her little sister, who ignores her until she receives a call that Nel is dead.

When Jules Abbott receives news that her older sister, Nel, has been found in the drowning pool, she drives back to the town that she had vowed never to return to. With Nel’s fifteen year old daughter, Lena, who believes that her mother has committed suicide and a town that she vowed to never return to, Jules is forced to relieve experiences that she’d rather forget. Lena is angry with her aunt for ignoring her mother for so long and doesn’t even want her around.

 

I picked up this book because Paula Hawkin’s last title, The Girl On the Train, was intriguing to me. Into the Water was fine. It’s very hard to follow a blockbuster like Girl, which had national success. It reminded me of when I rushed to read Her Fearful Symmetry by Audrey Niffenegger after the huge success of The Time Traveler’s Wife. I was very disappointed. I felt like the author built you up so high and then left you there to dangle without ever knowing if you would sink or float.

I will not say that the book didn’t have its moments but it’s so hard to get invested in characters that you don’t even like. For argument’s sake, you can say that the title is intriguing, and it is, but…it was all over the place. There were too many characters to count. There were too many back stories to remember. There were too many time hops and not enough real story. To top it all off, the ending felt almost like an afterthought.

I really suggest that you check it out and prove me wrong. Maybe I missed something. Let me know your thoughts. Hopefully you’ll enjoy it more than I did.

– Reviewed by Damera, Newburg Branch

The Willing Murder by Jude Deveraux

The Willing Murder by Jude Deveraux is a light romantic mystery with intrigue, family trauma, and interesting characters that make you care about a 20 year-old murder.

It all began with murder. The dirt had been shifted, moved from beneath. Were one of them still alive?  Once the tree was in place and dirt filled in around it, it would all be over.

Straight out of college, two years ago, Kate Medlar started selling real estate, a job she loved. However, selling the same suburban type homes left her feeling like she wanted to do more. Life at home, too, was becoming more than she could take. Most of her life she had been dealing with her mother’s nerves and fears, as well as her overbearing and interfering uncles. It was time for a change.

In the middle of one her mother’s rants she accidentally mentioned an aunt, her father’s sister, that Kate had never known existed. Sara Medlar was a famous writer who lived in Lachlan, Florida. From what Kate read about the town there was also realtor trying to bring the town back to life. Locating old houses that just needed to be fixed up and put on the market, was just the kind of challenge that Kate needed and a good excuse to finally leave home.

Lachlan, was a town divided by the affluent families on one side and the improvised families on the other. Jack Wyatt had grown up on the wrong side of town and had been tied to the bad reputation of his father for years.  It had taken time, help and tough love , but he was determined to make a difference for both him and the town. With Sara Medlar, as his silent partner, he formed a construction company focusing on rebuilding some of the run down homes. But as rumor would have it, talk said, he was living with Sara Medlar, using her, taking money from and sleeping with a woman old enough to be his grandmother.

The minute she stepped into town Kate heard all the gossip surrounding her Aunt and Jack Wyatt, while a pillar of Lachlan’s community, Alistair Stewart, found the young woman just the right diversion he needed. After all the years she had taken care of her mother, she would now help Aunt Sara and put a stop to Jack Wyatt using her.

She was in for a surprise. Jack and Aunt Sara were nothing like the gossips would have her believe.

Kate, Sara, and Jack just can’t seem to leave the mysterious death of the two women alone. They go in search of answers, while a murderer tries to stop them. Jack has another problem, he is drawn to Kate who seems to have eyes for the debonair, smooth talking Alistair Stewart.

Although the book is written for adults, older teens could also enjoy this murder mystery as well see several of the main characters in their teens.

Format Available: Book, eBook, Audiobook

Review by Katy, Shawnee Branch

The Bone Garden by Tess Gerritsen

What would you do if you discovered a skull while working in your garden? Well, that’s what happens to Julie Hamill in The Bone Garden by Tess Gerritsen. Finding that skull causes a whole of drama for Julie when the forensic team finds the rest of the skeleton. But there’s good news the skeleton according to the forensic anthropologist has been there for at least two hundred years; meaning Julie garden and yard isn’t a crime scene. However, this discovery leads Julie on a quest to find a relative of the previous owner. Once she meets him she gets sucked into trying to solve a two-hundred-year-old mystery surrounding her house and the family of the previous owner.

What Julie discovers leads her to another mystery in 1830’s Boston, this time a series of murders. When Irish immigrant Rose Connolly witnesses a murder not realizing that it is tied to her own sister’s death in childbirth. That seems eerily like Jack the Ripper has crossed the Atlantic. A group of medical students including Oliver Wendell Holmes and the fictional Norris Marshall realizes that Rose could be the next victim, Norris does everything he can to protect her. After “meeting” Rose Julie is determined to find out what happened to her as well as solving the mystery of the skeleton in the garden.

Tess Gerritsen does an awesome balancing both mysteries the murders in the 1830’s and the mystery of the skeleton and the house in the present. Each mystery is given the right amount of book time, and unlike other novels, with dual time periods, The Bone Garden doesn’t switch time periods with every chapter. They switch when the narrative needs the switch and it just flows into the next time period. She blends the historical characters such as Oliver Wendell Holmes in with fictional characters allowing them to co-exist in a fictional mystery.

Fans of Tess’s other books – as well as fans of the history, science, and mysteries in general – will enjoy this tale.

Formats Available: Regular Type, Large Type, Paperback, Audiobook, eBook

Reviewed by CarissaMain Library

“We didn’t know it then, but our fairy tale was about to begin.”

“In those first few weeks, I had no idea that our story would be one so full of love.  When I adopted Juniper, I thought she needed me, but every time I see her snaggletoothed smile, I realize I need her, too.” – Jessika Coker, author of Juniper

The world presents before us a dichotomy: the good and the bad.  While this may well be a grossly oversimplified view of our world, my point is that we experience in our lives both good and bad, highs and lows, etc., and it seems far too easy to become focused on those less pleasant aspects of our lives here on earth.

With this in mind, I felt it appropriate for my review this month to be of a book whose focus is the pleasant, a simple “feel-good” story.  And why not?  It is immensely satisfying and uplifting to read about the wonderful things of which people are capable, and Juniper, the Happiest Fox is a book that very much accomplishes this.

To begin, I must place before you an admission: due to the literature of my youth and of conventional folklore, the fox is an animal towards whom I have always felt a certain level of disdain.  Despite not owning fowl or other animal stock vulnerable to the fox, I have always felt a great sense of mistrust toward them.  And then there is the fact that I am the proud owner of a Wire Fox Terrier, who, as her breed name implies, finds as primary quarry the fox.  Well, Ms. Coker and her slim book have revised my feelings regarding this widely-decried “beast.”

Ms. Coker is a person who has since childhood felt a great love for all animals, and as she aged and collected experiences in veterinary clinics and animal rescue organizations, the fox became an especially beloved creature for her.  One day, she received word that there was a litter of kits in need of a good home.  When she arrived, the runt, who was no larger than the hand of a small child, called to her heart, and since in Native American culture juniper is employed to keep negativity at bay, it seemed the perfect name for this tiny ball of fur with an unforgettable snaggletooth that added to her perfection.

Thus, the adventures, filled with trials and tribulations, began for Ms. Coker and her Juniper.  This is a short read filled with anecdotes and lovely pictures that depict the love and affection that is possible between man and “beast.”  I would recommend this for anyone in need of a pick-me-up in a world that, perhaps, offers too many opportunities for pick-me-downs.

“Juniper gives me hope.  She is my constant reminder that there is still, goodness, purity, and unconditional love in this world.  The world can be heavy, but there’s still a little bit of magic if you know where to look.” – Jessika Coker, author of Juniper

Formats Available:  Book, eBook

Reviewed by Rob, Crescent Hill