Tag Archives: Lindsay

Since You’ve Been Gone by Morgan Matson

Since You've Been Gone

When you’re scared of taking risks everyday life obstacles can seem overwhelming.  That was what life was like for Emily.  She didn’t like being the center of attention or going to parties or really anything involving people.  She liked cross county because she loved running with her thoughts and being alone.  That was before Sloane moved to town.  Sloane was brave and vibrant and exhilarating- everything Emily was too afraid to be.  Emily loved to be known as “Sloane’s friend” even to people who had known Emily her whole life but had just met Sloane.  It didn’t bother Emily that Sloane got all the guys, all the attention, and all the glory.  Emily liked being boring.  But then Sloane vanishes without a trace.

Emily shows up like always to Sloane’s house and finds no one is there.  Just as quickly as she had come into Emily’s life two years earlier Sloane was gone.  The only sign that Sloane had existed at all was a cryptic letter which shows up at Emily’s house a week after Sloane disappears.  It isn’t a ransom note or an explanation of what happened, it’s a list.  A list of several things Emily feels quite sure she will never be brave enough to do such as pick apples at night, kiss a stranger, and go skinny dipping!

As the days tick by and Emily’s perfectly planned summer is ruined by loss and confusion she makes a decision that completing the list might bring her closer to finding the truth of what happened to her best friend.  Emily starts the list thinking it will help her find Sloane but in an endearing, coming of age and self-acceptance story, what Emily really find’s is herself.  It is easy to live in someone else’s shadow if it means never having to take risks.  But what is a life worth having if you’re not living it?

Since You’ve Been Gone is a wonderful novel full of rich social themes – friendship, self-identity, self-discovery, and self-acceptance.  While marketed toward teens this novel is an important reminder to us at any age about being kind to ourselves and others.  Emily is afraid to be vulnerable to others but it keeps her closed off to a life full of possibilities.  She finds braveness in a friend who appears to be the epitome of everything Emily wishes she was – but we all know appearances are often misleading.  So does Emily complete the list?  Does she find Sloane and learn why her best friend disappeared over night?  It’s well worth the read if you’d like to find out.

Formats Available: Book (Regular Print)

Reviewed by Lindsay, Southwest Branch

Over-Dressed: The Shockingly High Cost of Cheap Fashion by Elizabeth L. Cline

“If you find what you like, buy it in several colors.” — Elizabeth L. Cline

overdressed

In 2009, author Elizabeth Cline found herself in a clothing crisis.  Following that advice, she purchased several cheap pairs of shoes from a powerhouse national discounter, the same pair of shoes in many different colors.  But only a few weeks later the pairs that hadn’t been worn to pieces were collecting dust in her closet now out dated and replaced by the next trend.  The author of Over-Dressed decided to take a hard look at what consumer shopping habits are, where are clothes come from, and the impact these changes have on a global economy.

The largest change has been the inclusion of foreign manufacturers.  Once New York and LA employed hundreds of garment workers; the United States boasted quality skills and material and created beautiful garments that aged well.  Some companies still employee domestic workers, but nothing like the heyday of American made fashion.  Cheaper labor overseas means companies can save large amounts of money, savings which encourage less investment domestically.

With costs lowering for garments, consumer’s mentalities towards clothing began to change.  We once had to labor for our clothing.  A single suit or dress would take an entire week’s wages.  Those that couldn’t afford to spend a week’s wages made their own clothing.  Consumers knew mending skills, sewing skills, how to use patterns, how to recycle material.  In an entire generation all of those skills are gone.  Ms. Cline discusses growing up with a mother and grandmother who sewed, hemmed, and patched, but she knew none of that.  She is not alone.  Clothing prices have dropped so low that most consumers would rather buy a new shirt than fix a detached button.

Not fixing clothing could also be attributed to not only cost, but construction of the clothing most people wear these days.  Ms. Cline examined all of the top brands and found that in the race for cheaper clothing the overall quality has dropped dramatically.  At one point the author discusses how just ten years ago doll clothing was better made than anything people wear today.  Consumers today have been taught not to care about construction, simply what is in trend.  Trends are so cheap to produce that even if a garment falls apart after a few wears, we can just go buy something new.  This is exactly what fast fashion stores want from consumers.

Fast fashion stores are the big clothing retailers that have revolving product…which all seems to look the same — twenty of the same dresses but in different bright colors; the same shirt in five different patterns — these are the staples of fast fashion stores.  Fast fashion retailers are those that when you begin to look over the racks and racks and racks of cheaply made clothing, you understand exactly how right Ms. Cline is — we are all walking around in the same clothing cheaply made junk.

The garment industry is now a global problem.  Consumers domestically hardly realize how many jobs have been shipped overseas and what that impact has on them locally.  Consumers likely don’t think about the treatment foreign workers receive while producing their cheap garments.  All they know is that they paid a steal for their new clothes.  Nor do they probably realize that with each new piece of clothing they buy because their old ones are not quality enough to last, millions of tons of garbage pile up in landfills.  All of that cheap fashion has to go somewhere.

This seems like a gloomy place to leave consumers (and readers!).  Many of which can’t afford the higher cost of quality, responsibly made clothing while continuing the habits society has created.  Ms. Cline offers simple changes to impact any wardrobe while also being more responsible shoppers.  Look at the material your clothing is made from.  Where is the garment you’re about to purchase made?  If a button falls off- can you learn to replace it?  Mend a seam?  Hem a pant?  Would you look through your closet and downsize?  Do you need five blue tank tops?  Seven dress shirts that all look the same?  If something doesn’t fit just the way you want, learn to take it in, let it out, shorten, and tighten.

Ms. Cline is compelling and down to Earth.  Your wardrobe and wallet will likely thank you for reading Over-Dressed.

 Formats Available: Book (Regular Print)

Reviewed by Lindsay, Southwest Branch

Hold Me Closer, Necromancer by Lish McBride

holdmenecro

We all have those lists of books waiting for the day when we might actually be able to read them.  How this title stayed on my list for so long seems like a mystery.  Humor, romance, adventure – this novel has it all.  While marketed toward an older teen audience, this can easily be enjoyed by an adult reader.

Samhain, nicknamed Sam, floats through life.  He is happy to work in a gross fast food restaurant, happy to drop out of college, happy to be nothing special.  Until the day that Sam learns he is very special.  Gifted with an ability hidden from him at birth by his mother, Sam must quickly learn the ways of Necromancy.

His goofy, big mouth nature seems to continually land him in deeper trouble till it looks like there’s no hope.  Thankfully, he isn’t in it alone.  Armed with good friends and a pack of werewolves, Sam must find a way to accept his true nature and defeat a really, really bad dude.

If you think this title isn’t for you, you’re likely wrong.  It does have elements of fantasy and magic but it mostly centers on accepting who you are, growing up, and finding confidence.  Sam is a loveably sarcastic main character, the dialogue is well written, and the plot is well developed (though at times predicable). Music lovers will appreciate the chapter titles (which are all song lyrics).  Readers will find themselves eagerly turning pages to find out Sam’s triumphs and failures.

This all around light and feel good novel by Lish McBride is highly recommend.

Formats Available: Book

Reviewed by Lindsay, Southwest Branch