Tag Archives: creepy crawlies

99 Gross Creepy Crawlies

99 of Katherine’s favorite gross creepy crawlies! Click on a link or use your google-fu to learn about one at a time, or go ahead and binge-read. I don’t judge. (Yes, this is an exercise in the Way of Effective Search Engine Use. Don’t forget Boolean operators, too. It’s how you separate the birds from the baseball teams.) Some of them are strikingly beautiful, like this Pepsis wasp:

A glossy midnight blue wasp with rust colored wings on a yellow flower.

By Pavel Kirillov from St.Petersburg, Russia (Tarantula Hawk Pepsis sp.) [CC BY-SA 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Creepy crawlies are rated one * to five *****, as follows:

* = cute or charismatic, not even slightly gross, unless you have a specific phobia of some kind, like a fear of spiders, and even then, you might make an exception. Examples: Ladybugs, Monarch Butterflies, Peacock Spiders.

** = only mildly gross, if you have a thing about critters with too many legs or slime. Examples: Tomato Hornworms, Garden Snails.

*** = medium gross – the standard level of gross. Those things that skitter across the floor in the dark. If you were asleep in bed, you wouldn’t want one to drop on your face without warning. Examples: House Centipedes, European Medicinal Leeches.

**** = these might put you off lunch, or make you itchy just thinking about them, they’re so intensely gross. Most endoparasites like pinworms belong here. I say “most” because It Gets Worse. If that doesn’t make you want to wash your hands carefully every time, I don’t know what will. Examples: Pinworms, Head Lice, Deer Ticks, Hagfish.

***** = the grossest. Read about these, and lose your belief in Nature as a benevolent force. Pure, weapons-grade nightmare fuel. And it’s not even fictional, like the chestbursters from the Alien film franchise (which were based on a mishmash of several real animals, by the way, just scaled up to people size). Five stars and underlined is your official warning for seriously disturbingly gross content. Examples: Deer Nose Botflies, Guinea Worm.

Are you ready? Let’s go!

The Official List of 100 Gross Creepy Crawlies

  1. * Beyonce’s Horsefly (Scaptia beyonceae) – let’s kick this off with one we’ve already covered.
  2. *** Goliath Bird Eating Tarantula – First short entry!
  3. *Stink Bugs
  4. **Isopod Eating Spiders
  5. ****Cheese maggot
  6. * Green Banana Cockroach (Panchlora nivea) – if you never thought a cockroach could be downright elegant, this jade-and-crystal critter might just change your mind. It’s also the first outright link!
  7. **Banana Slug
  8. **Feather Mite
  9. ***Social Caterpillars on the march, in tents (we have Eastern Tent Caterpillars, if you see any like those), just chillin’ on a treeLonomia obliqua caterpillars are venomous, and falling into a colony like that can kill you. Although other caterpillars are venomous, these are notorious killers.
  10. **Scorpions
  11. ***Giant Weta
  12. **Bombardier Beetle – when threatened, these beetles mix chemicals inside their bodies and shoot a jet of boiling hot chemicals out their butts. Nice.
  13. *Water Strider
  14. *June Beetle
  15. *Aphid farming by ants – sweet honeydew.
  16. **Eyelash Mite
  17. **Carnivorous Butterfly – butterflies, feeding on my rotting flesh? It’s more common than you’d think.
  18. **Witchetty Grubs
  19. ***Tarantula Hawk Wasp – big bold beautiful wasps of the genus Pepsis that paralyze and lay their eggs on large spiders, which they bury alive for safekeeping. The grubs eat the spider alive from the inside out, carefully sparing vital parts until last. You’ll notice this becomes a theme, because there’s a LOT of pseudo-parasitic wasps. I’m not kidding. I wanted this to be interesting, so I didn’t just list 100 pseudo-parasitic wasps. Here’s a list just of the Pepsis species alone. Yeah.
  20. *Fig Wasp
  21. *Bee Moth
  22. **Edible Crickets – why of course there’s recipes! The word you’re looking for is “chapulines” and I hope you like spicy flavors and lime! If you can’t get fried crickets, you can substitute with plain corn flakes and season them yourself. Not the sugar frosted kind. Plain corn flakes taste just like fried plain crickets. Or is it the other way around? Hmm.
  23. **Fighting Crickets
  24. ***Deathwatch Beetle
  25. *Velvet Ant
  26. ****Demodex Mites
  27. ****Body Lice – like regular head lice, but adapted to live in your clothes. Lots of animals have lice adapted specifically to them, and the relationships between the lice actually tell you a lot about when the species split from its relatives. That’s how long humans have had clothes: long enough to get our very own clothes lice. They’re vectors for epidemic typhus, among other unpleasant infections.
  28. ****Snake Ticks – like regular ticks, but they specialize in snakes. Google image search at your own peril. Poor sneks. 🙁
  29. *Arctic Woolybear – like regular woolybear caterpillars, but they live in the arctic, and live over a decade as they freeze and thaw with the seasons, for brief speed-eating sessions, before they freeze solid again and spend the winter in suspended animation, like a science fiction space colonist on an interstellar transport.
  30. *Magicicada
  31. **House Centipede – one of the top predators of the basement ecosystem. They routinely eat the next item on the list, which is a great reason to be nice and encourage the centipedes to stay.
  32. ***Brown Recluse Spider
  33. *Ant Lion/lacewing – these guys are awesome, and they’re easily found in bare dirt or loose sand, where they dig pits and wait for ants to stumble in.
  34. **Cochineal – a scale insect that lives on prickly pear cactus, and the source of the versatile red dye carmine, AKA “natural red 4” in your list of food additives. It’s perfectly safe for consumption. Remember: it’s not a case of IF you’re eating insects, it’s a case of how much.
  35. ***Bagworms
  36. **Silkworms
  37. *Jewel Beetle – the beetles whose elytra are used for beetle wing embroidery.
  38. *****Deer Nose Botfly
  39. *Plant-eating Spider Bagheera kiplingi feeds almost entirely on plant matter: the beltian bodies of acacias.
  40. **Decorator Crab – crabs that decorate themselves with bits of their environment to blend in better, hooking debris onto Velcro-like extensions of their shells. Fabulous!
  41. ***Wolf Spider – widespread spiders that hunt actively rather than waiting in a web for prey. They take very good care of their babies, carrying them around until they’re big enough to take care of themselves.
  42. **Lac Beetle
  43. *****Tapeworms – brain cysts
  44. **Sand Fleas
  45. *Preying Mantis
  46. **Dung Beetle
  47. **Giant Isopod – the giant, deep-sea relatives of our familiar roly-poly. You can get phone holders in the shape of one.
  48. *Roly Polies – the roly-poly, everyone’s favorite land crustacean.
  49. **Puss Caterpillar – although the caterpillars of the Southern Flannel Moth have a cute name, their fluffy hairs can deliver a nasty sting.
  50. **Hissing Cockroach
  51. **Bullet Ant
  52. **Velvet Worm
  53. ***Honeypot Ant
  54. *Diving Beetle
  55. **** The Fish Tongue Isopod (Cymotha exigua) – It’s a parasitic isopod that replaces fish tongues for a living.
  56. *Lightning Bugs
  57. **Coconut Crab
  58. **Fire Ant
  59. **Jorogumo
  60. *Leafcutter Ant
  61. *Water Collecting Beetle
  62. ***Giant Red Leech
  63. ** Peacock Tarantula (Poecilotheria metallica)This royal blue and white tarantula is one of the prettiest spiders, which is actually saying something. There are some extremely fancy spiders out there.
  64. *Emerald Ash Borer
  65. ****Colonial Huntsman Spider
  66. ***Goliath Beetle
  67. ****Chigoe Flea
  68. **** Bedbugs (Cimex lectularius) – you probably already know about these. And maybe you even know a few unsavory details about their personal lives.
  69. *****Guinea Worm
  70. **Gall Wasp
  71. ****Medicinal Leech
  72. *Rocky Mountain Locust – Everyone remembers the Passenger Pigeon, but not the Rocky Mountain Locust. Let’s fix that right now.
  73. *Cotton Boll Weevil – historically significant pest of cotton plants. Between the weevil and depleted soil, the South’s cotton cash-crop industry couldn’t survive the onslaught, and George Washington Carver promoted peanuts to help farmers transition to more sustainable industry, reliable profits, and better farming practices. He didn’t invent peanut butter, he saved the South’s economy… with SCIENCE. The only creepy crawly on the list to have its own public monument.
  74. ***Twisted Wing Parasite
  75. *Orchid Mantis
  76. *Giant Stick Insect
  77. ***** Human Botfly – Botflies generally lay their eggs on animals, and the maggots tunnel into the flesh to grow up. This one’s famous for feeding on people, although it’s not the only one that does.
  78. * Orchid Bee – glitzy green bees that collect orchid (and other plant) scents in special leg pockets. If these were humans, you’d try to get a date by going to a store, and stuffing your pants with the entire contents of the scents section.
  79. ** Diving Bell Spider – these mostly aquatic spiders spin webs that trap air under water like a diving bell. Hairs on their abdomen trap air as well, so that they can take their air supply with them.
  80. **Cat Flea – not just for cats, cat fleas feed on lots of mammals.
  81. *Vulture bee
  82. *Blowfly
  83. *Golden Orb Weaver
  84. ***Phorid Fly
  85. *Peacock Jumping Spider
  86. *Killer Bees – the story of the creation of “Killer Bees” is a fable in the problem with over-optimistic thinking. European honeybees are not very aggressive, and they live in large colonies to put aside so much honey. Sadly, they don’t do well in high heat and humidity. African Honeybees thrive in tropical heat, but live in small colonies, and are very aggressive, to deal with creatures like the Honey Badger. A scientist wanted to establish a beekeeping industry in Brazil, and thought that if they crossed the European Honeybees with the African Honeybees, they’d get tame bees that lived in large numbers and produced lots of honey, and also did well in hot climates. Unfortunately, what they got instead were bees that lived in large numbers and produced lots of honey but got the African Honeybee aggressiveness instead.
  87. **Saddleback Caterpillar
  88. *****Mangoworm
  89. *****Horsehair Worm
  90. ***Hagfish
  91. *Arachnocampa fungus gnat
  92. *** Black California Sea Hare (Aplysia vaccaria) – A huge black sea slug the size of a cat. Even though it’s just big and slimy, it got an extra star for its gargantuan size.
  93. **Sausage Fly – Siafu, African Driver Ant – specifically, the big, sausage-link looking males, and what happens to them.
  94. **Japanese Giant Hornet
  95. **Ladybug
  96. **Anopheles gambiae mosquito
  97. **Aedes aegypti
  98. ***Sea cucumber – these majestic sea creatures have a really basic anatomy. Basically, they are a tube from mouth to butt. Food goes in one end, and waste out the other. Some can also eject spaghetti-like tubes that compose part of their respiratory system as a defense mechanism, in the hopes that a predator will be entangled or leave the slimy rest of the sea cucumber alone. Don’t worry, the tubes can grow back.
  99. ****Sea cucumber butt tenants – being a relatively simple tube, sea cucumbers are also hosts to lots of other, smaller animals, some of which don’t merely live under or on the sea cucumber, but actually inside the sea cucumber. Since the mouth is surrounded by tentacles and backed sometimes by calcified plates, the prime real estate inside a sea cucumber is the butt. Nice. Here’s a sea pig – one of the most charismatic of these inspiring creatures – and its bevy of attendant shrimp.