Monthly Archives: January 2020

Dining with the Famous and Infamous by Fiona Ross

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Recently and quite by chance, I came across mention of a book entitled Dining with the Famous and Infamous published in 2016 and authored by Fiona Ross.  Now, whenever the opportunity arises to mix different things I enjoy into one experience, I typically leap with little thought.  Since I consider myself a person with rather broad proclivities toward the gastronomic along with an inclination for the printed word, with this book involving both, I placed a reserve on it immediately.  When it arrived, I was not disappointed.

The book contains five chapters that divide the diners into categories, with each person begin given a mere four or five pages each: artists, movie stars, musicians, writers, and “the nuts.”  This is an outstanding format in that it allows the reader to jump from person to person based on his or her personal preferences.  I admit that I began with the writers, with Evelyn Waugh first up to bat and being introduced with the following:

Cecil Beaton’s diaries famously record the death of Evelyn Waugh in 1966: “Evelyn Waugh is in his coffin.  Died of snobbery.”

Well, a good laugh is an excellent way to begin any reading, really.  And it continued on to C.S. Lewis:

He had unusual views about boiled eggs, though: when Roger Lancelyn Green offered Lewis a hard-boiled egg on the train from Oxford to Cambridge, he refused.  “No, no, I musn’t!” insisted Lewis.  “It’s supposed to be an aphrodisiac.  Of course, it’s all right for you as a married man – but I have to be careful.” 

Indeed.

While unshakably partial towards the writer, I must be honest that the anecdotes relating to movie stars and musicians were quite a bit spicier (and I refer not to the food), and I am fond of spice.  From Liz Tylor’s love affairs with food (and men) to the whirlwind/tornado/tsunami that was the The Rolling Stones of the 1960s, the stories paint a picture of decadence that is apparently the status quo in the world of the halls of rock and the silver screen.

Naturally, Ms. Ross would be remiss if recipes were omitted.  Highlights include:

“Get Gassed” Vodka and Grapefruit Juice (Andy Warhol)

Chicken Cacciatore to Woo Arthur Miller (Marilyn Monroe)

Cornmeal Okra (Woody Guthrie)

Goat Curry (Ian Fleming)

Oysters (Casanova)

Of course, the full recipe details are provided in the book.

A Glance at Louisville’s Music through LFPL’s catalog

As a budding musician, I’ve been lucky to grow up in Louisville. Being influenced by the movement and history of this scene has created a solid foundation to explore my interests. It serves as a trusty anchor that reminds me to stay engaged with music culture. Thankfully, your local library likes to support this scene in a handful of ways, one of which is by carrying a whole bunch of CD’s produced by local artists!

As always, you can check these things out FOR FREE! I don’t have an exact count, but our local music catalog is around 600 items and is constantly growing. I haven’t heard all of them, but I’ve heard quite a few and I’m always impressed with it. Below are 5 albums from our catalog that I highly recommend – in no particular order.

Hello, Anxious by Mountain Asleep (2008)

This was released right before I noticed our local scene and they were a fan favorite of the community I found for their memorable performances. This chaotic, noodly, and ecstatically positive punk record has left a lasting impression on my musicianship and taste. These members have made music elsewhere in bands like Xerxes, August Moon, Whips/Chains, and Cereal Glyphs to name only a few. Also, listen to a Rhode Island band called Tiny Hawks for a reference on this style of Punk.

Red Glows Brighter by Second Story Man (2006)

This band started in 1998, and though they have a couple of LP’s, this EP stands as my favorite release. The atmosphere they present in this is so pleasant and shimmery that it captures a comforting nostalgic quality. Stylistically, this is an “Indie Rock” band but their identity is unique with complex songwriting and an intriguing sonic palette. I find this somewhere between Sonic Youth’s Experimental or No Wave take on Indie Rock and the poppy dreaminess from someone like The Cocteau Twins.

One Less Heartless To Fear by Shipping News (2010)

This is the last release in a career that started in 1996. It was recorded live at Skull Alley and the energy that comes through is killer. This band helped define the “Louisville Sound” and Post-Rock in the 90’s with its dark aesthetic, mathy time signatures, avant-garde construction, and spoken word vocal performances. If you like Noise Rock and Post-Hardcore in bands like Shellac or SWANS, this refined and uniquely Louisville approach will come off as tasteful, elegant, and sublime.

Spiderland by Slint (1991)

If Shipping News helped define Louisville and Post-Rock, this album is the progenitor. This blurb won’t do justice like the books or documentaries about it, but this broke the rules of Rock music and its influence is seen around the world. If The Beatles wrote the blueprint for the “Rock Band”, Slint deconstructed that and put an existential memoir next to it. I can’t point to similar music other than Post-Rock bands to come after it, but if you are moved by something like Martin Luther’s 95 Theses, you’ll admire this reformation.

Self Help by Straight A’s (2010)

Though I might call this a “Punk” record for its explosive attitude, it bears little resemblance to many Emo/Hardcore conventions from someone like Mountain Asleep. This album is weird, angular, and discordant, all while being very catchy and dancey. I love the short songs, most being under 2 minutes and none reaching the 3-minute mark. Imagine the oddly sexy, dancey vibes of The Blood Brothers, the abrasion from Mindless Self Indulgence, and the stripped-down instrumentation from Pre.

— Reviewed by Noah, Bon Air

A Grief Observed by C. S. Lewis

“It is hard to have patience with people who say, ‘There is no death’ or ‘Death doesn’t matter.’ There is death. And whatever is matters. And whatever happens has consequences, and it and they are irrevocable and irreversible. You might as well say that birth doesn’t matter.”

― C.S. Lewis, A Grief Observed

In 1961, C. S. Lewis published A Grief Observed, a book about the death of his wife and his journey through his grief.  Nearly sixty years later, people are still connecting with Lewis’  words.  I read A Grief Observed last January, a few years after losing a dear friend.  Lewis affirmed my thoughts and feelings again and again and I wished that I had read it years before when I was in the midst of my grief. Death affects all of us. The loss of a loved one is at some point brought before us and yet still we often fumble in our interactions about grief and with the griever. I think Lewis says it best when he says:

“I see people, as they approach me, trying to make up their minds whether they’ll ‘say something about it’ or not. I hate if they do, and if they don’t.”

― C. S. Lewis, A Grief Observed

You can’t help but feel Lewis’ deep love and subsequent anguish at the loss of his wife. His words ring true as he describes the anguish, the emptiness, the anger and finally the desideratum surrounding a life partner taken too quick. Lewis puts words to an experience all face but few can articulate in quite a poignant manner. He writes:

“No one ever told me that grief felt so like fear. I am not afraid, but the sensation is like being afraid. The same fluttering in the stomach, the same restlessness, the yawning. I keep on swallowing. At other times it feels like being mildly drunk or concussed. There is a sort of invisible blanket between the world and me. I find it hard to take in what anyone says. Or perhaps, hard to want to take it in. It is so uninteresting. Yet I want the others to be about me. I dread the moments when the house is empty. If only they would talk to one another and not to me.”

– C. S. Lewis, A Grief Observed

How often have those who have been in a period of loss felt that restlessness with a listlessness that makes it hard to be? You can’t really sit still because you need to move before you drown further in the sadness that has grabbed hold of all of you. If you are there and you need help facing life after death, I highly recommend A Grief Observed. I recommend it for anyone who wants to witness fierce love and loss and becoming who you will be without, all that you were before.

“Her absence is like the sky, spread over everything.

But no, that is not quite accurate. There is one place where her absence comes locally home to me, and it is a place I can’t avoid. I mean my own body. It had such a different importance while it was the body of H.’s lover. Now it’s like an empty house.”

― C. S. Lewis, A Grief Observed

– Review by Catherine, Main Library