Monthly Archives: September 2021

Seed by Ania Ahlborn

As we approach “spooky season” I start to crave a good horror novel…one that I can read on the couch in the middle of the day with all the windows wide open and the sun shining, of course. It’s not my usual fare but a coworker recommended Seed to me, Anita Ahlborn’s debut novel set in rural Louisiana, and I was intrigued and in the mood for something supernatural and sinister. I got exactly what I wished for.

Jack Winters has been carrying the burden of something evil and hungry all his life – he’s even gotten the snarling grin that chases him tattooed onto his back – but despite years of silence and his attempts to build a life with his wife Aimee and their two daughters, despite rebuilding his terrified psyche from what he saw as a child and struggling financially in the present to make ends meet for his small family, he’s about to learn he hasn’t outrun anything. On a dark highway traveling home the Winters family experiences a freak accident that brings Jack face to face with his monster…and this time his youngest daughter, Charlie, sees it too. And Charlie begins to change almost immediately, following the Young Child in a Horror Story playbook: her health suffers, she starts acting out, she suddenly knows things she shouldn’t and starts sowing discord, and then violence. Aimee knows something is wrong, but not to what extent, as her youngest starts to stalk the household. And Jack is torn between finally telling Aimee everything about his past and losing her and the girls forever, and realizing that by the time it becomes vital, it’s too late…that it was always too late. Because while Jack remembers the demon that haunts him there’s a lot of details about his flight from his own childhood home that he doesn’t remember, and he is forced to start searching for the truth about his family, his parents and a single, similar escalation of terror they all experienced before in order to have a chance at saving Charlie in the present.

I really liked the Winters family and felt terribly for them, even if you logically know that it’s not always wise to get attached to the characters in horror stories.* Jack worked a tough, physical job for the family he adored and played in a band with his buddies on the side, and he genuinely reminded me of some of the boys that lived in my grandparents’ holler growing up, a little wild and extremely into metal bands and WWE but you knew they were good-hearted. I don’t see a lot of people like that reflected in literature, and I loved it, even if in this case they were being seriously terrorized. We experience some of the more terrifying scenes from Aimee’s perspective while alone with the kids, and I really felt for her as well: in addition to being terrified for/terrorized by her own daughters, we the readers know Jack had been trying hard to conceal his past from her, and so it was obvious to us that she was in no way equipped to deal with Charlie’s sudden, dramatic possession. Ahlborn peppers the book with creepiness, sliding brief scenes and horrifying lines from Charlie into the constant narrative of Jack’s mounting dread, and they’re effective. Her progression from normal little girl to a vessel for unspeakable evil is gradual, until the plot crashes into us – and the Winters family – and you realize along with all of them that there will be no return to innocence.

I’ve read reviews of this book after the fact where readers have surmised that it contains a major theme of how family violence gets passed down in families for one generation after another. As far as I can tell the events of the story happen over the course of a couple of weeks – I found myself assuming Jack had so much more time to figure out how to save his family, right up until the climax of the novel suddenly crashed down on him and us. Additionally, one of the factors that makes the possession and sundering of this family so painful to read is because Jack clearly loved his children, and treated them well, and he and Aimee loved each other and were fighting desperately to hold their family together. There wasn’t a history of violence in Jack’s family as far as we can see and even if there had been, experiencing familial abuse as a child isn’t a guarantee that a person will grow up to be abusive.

So in my opinion, this isn’t a story about the enduring nature of family violence. It’s simply a story about the Devil playing a game wherein he wagers that a parent will murder their possessed child to protect themselves, because even when he loses he wins, and he’s been winning like that for a very long time. And now it’s Jack’s turn to play.

I’d recommend this book to horror fans who appreciate a Southern Gothic set dressing, creepy kids and the slow reveal of a thriller, with a moderate amount of gore and a side of existential dread. As it turns out however, Ania Ahlborn is one of the more prolific horror authors in recent history, and the plots of her books run the gamut of horror tropes from cannibalistic hillbillies to haunted houses to unseen monsters lurking in the woods, so if you’re a horror fan who hasn’t yet heard of Ahlborn, it looks like she writes a little something for everybody…as it were.

*As a side note, I try to flag reviews of books I read where animals experience violence, because that can be a major trigger for a lot of folks. It feels silly in a book where so much haunting and harm comes to humans, including kids, which would theoretically take precedence over animals in a lot of our sympathies, but just in case I’ll put it here anyway: be aware, a dog is hurt during the course of this story.

– Review by SarahMain Library

Survive the Night by Riley Sager

It’s 1991 and Charlie Jordan is having the worst year of her life. Her best friend and college roommate Maddie was murdered by a suspected serial killer and Charlie has retreated into a fantasy world to deal with her grief and guilt. Charlie was with Maddie the night she died, but after a fight Charlie left her friend and went home. Maddie’s body was found a few days later.

Despite the care and attention of a loyal boyfriend, Charlie feels she has to get away from campus to start to heal, so she calls a number on the local ride share board and snags a ride back to Ohio with a man named Josh. Charlie assumes Josh is a fellow student, but as they begin their journey Charlie starts to feel like Josh’s stories don’t add up. Soon Charlie begins to suspect that Josh is the serial killer responsible for the murder of her best friend and she has to figure out a way to survive this night and save herself.

I thoroughly enjoyed Survive the Night and found the premise to be unique. This is a book that could only have taken place in the early nineties, because with the advent of cell phones and GPS a lot of Charlie’s struggles could have been avoided. But Sager knows this and tries to make the most out of setting this thriller in the not-so-distant past. Music and cultural events of the era weave throughout the book, with grunge band Nirvana playing a role in the plot development.

This book has a fast moving story and plenty of twists and turns to keep you engaged. Charlie’s way of dealing with her grief and pain has been to place herself inside a classic film instead of facing the events in front of her. This makes Charlie an unreliable narrator. You’re sometimes not sure if what is happening is really happening, or if it is what’s happening in the movie in Charlie’s head. I didn’t love the side plot about Charlie’s mental disassociations to deal with her pain and grief, but it works to move the story along.

This book is perfect for fans of true crime stories, podcasts like My Favorite Murder, or those who like recent titles like The Guest List, The Girl on the Train, or the works of Ruth Ware.

– Review by Jenny, Middletown Branch

Music with Hoopla!

As years come and go, so do our contracts with certain services. Unfortunately, this new fiscal year has marked the end of our most recent contract with Kanopy… But! In return, we’ve picked up a contract with Hoopla! While Kanopy primarily focused in movies, Hoopla offers much more, including access to television shows, E-books, audiobooks, and comics! On top of all that, and for the first time in LFPL history, you can have access to stream a variety of mainstream music, popular classics, soundtracks, and more! You can browse their music catalog under their collections or genre sections, or by using their search function on the home page. In this piece, I’ll highlight a few of my favorites from this catalog that you can listen to today! Provide Hoopla with your library card information and gain access to all of these links.

Hoopla offers a TON of the incredibly well produced Audiotree Live Sessions. The image on our left is for the performance of some buddies of mine in Pinegrove, a band I’ve had the pleasure of playing with, and their skill made those shows some of the best I’ve ever been a part of. Yet ANOTHER example of the mysterious waters between Emo and Country, and they hit a home-run every time. Audiotree has helped several buddy bands I’ve played with over the years, marking them as a desirable privilege for any travelling independent band: Leggy, Trunkweed, The Reptilian, Ratboys, White Reaper, and Slingshot Dakota, just to name a few. Check out Invalids, Birds in Row, and Elephant Gym for more favorites.

This is the newest release from St. Vincent, marking it her 6th solo studio album. St. Vincent has one of my favorite catalogs in Art Rock, for her sophistication and guitar shredding skills. She’s toyed with many styles over the years, ranging from sexy and funky to delicate and charming, but this new effort has her leaning specifically into the nostalgia of New York in the 1970’s. A style that’s hard to emulate, but her songs here go toe to toe with many of the Classic Rock greats. In some places, this makes me wonder if my mom would tear up to these songs, fooling her into thinking it was a Bowie or Clapton tune. Despite how different this style may look for St. Vincent, I think she is as in her prime for this record as she’s always been.

This 2000 record may have been ignored or scoffed at later in Rock history for its short-lived fashion sense, but considering this album is 21 years old, Nu-Metal has never sounded so good. Perhaps I’m clouded by my nostalgia of listening to this as a kid while playing video games, but this unique blend of Metal, Industrial, Hip-Hop, and Electronica was ground breaking for its time and Linkin Park deserves that credit for shaping Rock and Metal moving into the 21st century. The music industry sucked a lot of life out of this project as time went forward, but this and their second album are Nu-Metal classics. A moment of silence for Chester Bennington, please… also, for Joey Jordison, of Slipknot, whom Hoopla offers a compilation of.

This album came out in 2003 and must have struck a chord with soon to be social media users, because I remember hearing “Such Great Heights” as the singular indie song that EVERYBODY knew once the internet made music discovery more accessible. There are countless covers of this song, and I’m SURE you’ve heard it in some capacity, but the rest of the album sews this single into a seamless work of art that can now be considered a godfather of Indietronica. I prefer Ben Gibbard here, as opposed to Death Cab For Cutie, for these graceful, groovy, and poetic tunes that the genre attempts to replicate to this day. This 10th Anniversary Edition has some covers and remixes of the tracklist as well.

— Reviewed by Noah, Bon Air Branch

Ten Graphics You Should Check Out

Real quick…there are tons of great comics out there and your library has quite a selection. We’ve got something for every age, rage, or cage, baby…believe that.

I’m not here to sell you anything, just sharing. Here are some works that I have enjoyed since the beginning of the year. Click on the links below and check the bibliography for more details (including a description of and – sometimes – reviews of the work).

Imagine if the Mothership Connection met Firefly…but funkier

Jonathan Hickman jump-starts the whole X-Men side of the Marvel Universe…which is X-cellent if you’ve never read them before and need a convenient place to dive in

Indigenous (?) rebellion against an American Empire gone amuck

Some of the most embarrassing autobiographical stories about the comic biz collected in one place

’70’s-into-’80’s sci-fi, sure, but it also is one of the early works that showed what a new wave of British artists were about to do to the comics industry…completely change it for the better

  • Ms. Tree by Max Allan Collins & Terry Beatty
Currently, the longest running continuous pulp-detective series in comics form (outside of comics strips)

  • Satania – Fabien Vehlmann, Marie Pommepuy, & Sébastien Cosset
From the same creative team that brought you Beautiful Darkness, a phantasmagorical tale about adventurers discovering what really lies deep below the Earth’s surface

Amazing art, fantastic story. You have got to read this one just for the beauty of it


Another great edition to DC’s Graphic Novels for Young Adults series. This time, it’s a coming of age tale of a daughter who feels she has had to live in her mother’s shadow for all these years, only to find her own path
Just gorgeous. Toppi is an amazing artist and an inspiration for many who’ve come since. Sci-fi, fantasy, you name it, he can do it all

All of these works can be checked out from LFPL. Each title has a “Check Our Catalog” link that will take you to where you can view the location and status of the specific item in our system. You may have the item shipped to the library of your choice by placing a hold request (using the “Place Request” button on the right-hand side of the item’s catalog entry).


If you are interested in discussing these titles or other works of sequential art, please join LFPL’s Graphic Novel Discussion Group. Our next meeting is this Saturday, September 11, 2021. We will be taking a look at The Great Darkness Saga by Paul Levitz and Keith Giffen.

– Review by Tony, Main Library