Monthly Archives: October 2021

Friends of the LFPL Annual Fall Book Sale

Saturday, November 06, 2021 – 09:00 AM – 05:00 PM

Join us for the Friends of the LFPL book sale! Find some fantastic bargains in our wide selection of gently used books.

Please note Saturday 9:00 a.m.- 11:00 a.m. will be a members-only preview. Memberships available at the door.

The sale will be open to the general public Saturday 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. and Sunday 1:00 – 5:00 p.m.

Location: Main Library, 301 York Street, Louisville, KY 40203

In Praise of Solitude

BUKOWSKI: A LIFE by Neeli Cherkovski

This is the book that I had been waiting for. This biography came out last year in time for Charles Bukowski’s 100th Birthday, August 16, 2020. It is a rewrite of Cherkovski’s 1990 book Hank: The Life of Charles Bukowski. It is updated as Hank (Charles Bukowski’s nickname) died in 1994.

Most people have heard of Bukowski and form polarizing opinions of him. He is either seen as a drunken, womanizing, slob and bum. Or as the King of the Streets and the working underclass. Especially the drinking kind. Like all of us, he was mostly somewhere in between the extremes that the world can see us as.

Cherkovski, a fine poet himself, was a friend of Hank’s and knew him well from the 1960’s until Hank’s death in 1994. He humanizes Hank and sees the wild man, but also sees the sensitive poet within. Hank was probably the most prolific poet ever. He lived to write. He often starved to write. The rest was just a rebellion against a phony society and abusive parents. His father beat him often with a razor strap and his mother offered no help. He also had really bad acne and was a total outcast in school. All of this oppression made one great poet with no pretensions except the one he created as himself, but he winks to let you in on it.

He began writing short stories, with very few getting published. Later he wrote poems that often were like short stories. He worked at the Post Office for about a decade. He was freed from that mental slavery and physical pain at age 50 by a publisher who paid him to just write. Since poetry doesn’t make a lot of money, Hank finished a novel in three weeks called Post Office. It is short and funny. He wrote five other novels and countless books of poetry. He endured the loneliness and solitude it takes to be a prolific writer. He starved for his art like few others.

So, read this book. Read his poems and novels. You will find he was a true philosopher of human nature, much like fellow Californian Eric Hoffer, but with poems.


AT THE CENTER OF ALL BEAUTY by Fenton Johnson

This is a book that I found by accident, and being a person who writes and craves solitude, this was a must read. The author’s name sort of rang a bell, but I couldn’t place him. Later I found out that Johnson grew up in Kentucky and he teaches half of the year right down the street from where I work at Spaulding University.

Much to my surprise, I had much in common with the author. His great grandfather and I have the same name. His family was close to the monks at Gethsemani. I have visited and know two friends of Thomas Merton, their most famous monk. And I got to meet Merton’s secretary. Although I’m not Catholic, I have an affinity for the monks. Johnson and I both have spent long periods of our lives living alone. Fate had a hand in this for both of us. We both crave SILENCE!  And Thoreau’s simplicity, too, as a direct rebellion against consumerism as happiness.

He quotes many of my favorite people, such as Van Gogh, Eudora Welty, Henry David Thoreau, Colin Wilson, Nietzsche, James Baldwin, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, and Virginia Woolf. Johnson is gay, and I am not, but that doesn’t really matter. We are both outsiders by nature and circumstance. Toward the end he goes into personal Queer experiences which I have no understanding of. But, I am truly grateful that they are getting the human rights and freedoms they deserve.

The French philosopher Blaise Pascal said it best, “All of humanity’s problems stem from man’s inability to sit quietly in a room alone. So, go sit in a room alone and read At the Center of All Beauty. You’ll be glad you did.

Reviewed by Tom, Main Library

The Birds of Opulence by Crystal Wilkinson

Crystal Wilkinson, founding member of the Affrilachian Poets and Kentucky’s current Poet Laureate, is an outstanding author even among our state’s especially rich history of lyrical storytellers. Set in the fictional rural, black township of Opulence, Kentucky, this 2016 novel gives voice to the lives of generations of women of the Goode and Brown families in the twentieth century. The reader floats through the hidden lives of these characters, suffering along with them the abuses and losses they experience and the pressure of living up to community moral expectations (or at least avoiding becoming the subject of local gossip and scorn). But there are also the joyful experiences – the public celebrations, family reunions. And above all there is love: the intensity of the romantic loves and the complexity of the love that binds the families.

Wilkinson brings to life for us a much different time when magic was much more real and connections to the land, to family, and to the community were uninterrupted by our current pace of life, industrialization, digitalization, and urbanization.

– Review by Scott, Main Library

Destination Romance: Two Books That Will Scratch Your Itch For Travel And Love

These books by Emily Henry are the perfect way to immerse yourself in your summer feels.

People We Meet on Vacation is a fun story about two college friends that go on vacation together every summer. Alex and Poppy couldn’t be any different from each other but what they have works…until it doesn’t. When one vacation goes completely wrong, Poppy and Alex take a two year break. Poppy is ready to fix their broken relationship and proposes a trip to do just that. Will Poppy and Alex mend their relationship? You have to read People We Meet on Vacation to find out.

This book is great fun for travelers and non-travelers alike. Henry’s descriptions of Poppy and Alex’s vacations will take you back to places you’ve visited or entice you to go to places you haven’t been. Travel the country from New Orleans, LA to Vail, CO with Alex and Poppy as they explore not only their vacation destinations but who they are as people and what they want from life.

Beach Read by Emily Henry is the story of two authors, Augustus Everett and January Andrews. January is trying to cure her writer’s block and write her next best-selling romance novel. What better place than the beach house her father left her? Augustus is writing his next literary best seller, right next door. Imagine January’s surprise when she discovers Augustus, an old college peer, living right out her doorstep. A challenge is issued. Can Augustus write the perfect romance novel? Will January be able to write a dark literary novel?

The two take turns giving lessons and field trips about their genre of expertise. From book clubs to death cult interviews the two run the gambit of experiences and challenge their views of the world. As they open up to each other about their writing experiences they learn even more about themselves and each other. Who will win the challenge and will it bring them together or divide them? Time will tell.

– Review by Catherine, Main Library